Menu
Borrowdale CE Primary School
  • Search

Remote Education

Remote Education

 

We believe that our school is the most suitable place for learning and that all children should attend school if they are healthy and well. However, remote education will be offered in situations where a class, a small number of children or an individual is feeling well, but need to self-isolate, or there are local restrictions requiring pupils to remain at home. For these situations we have made contingency plans and are able to switch to home learning immediately, with almost no delay. This is because all children who need to access their learning from home will be provided with a school iPad to use at home loaded with all the apps the children need.

 

What does a typical day in 'Lockdown Learning' look like?

By 9am every day, the teachers share a timetable on ClassDojo with suggested timings and links to video lessons, worksheets and other resources. At some point every morning the teachers will meet their class on Zoom to discuss the day ahead, to teach and to connect with everyone. 

We are keeping as much as possible to the agreed Borrowdale School Curriculum, even whilst children are learning at home. Completed tasks and activities are shared by the pupils with their teachers using ClassDojo and the teachers will make sure that all work is acknowledged and leave a constructive comment to show how children can progress.

Teachers are available between 8.50am and 3.30pm. Teaching assistants help to share the teachers' responsibilities during the day. Whilst supporting the home learning, teachers are also teaching children in school and they may not respond to requests immediately.

Weekly learning packs are distributed to the pupils' homes with the resources they need to engage with the online learning for the week ahead.

 

What are the expectations for children's engagement for home learning and parents support?

The amount of work provided will be equivalent to the amount of work that would reasonably be expected to be completed in school. Guidance from the government sets out the following expectations:

• Key Stage 1: 3 hours a day on average across the cohort, with less for younger children

• Key Stage 2: 4 hours a day

We are mindful that we live in difficult times and recognise that we are all doing our best for our children. If you are experiencing difficulties in meeting the government's expectations or in supporting your child's learning, please get in touch with your child's teacher. Usually the solution is easily found.

 

We will instigate a conversation with parents when we become concerned about a child's engagement with their work. This is because in these challenging times we are genuinely concerned about all our pupils' wellbeing as well as their academic progress.

Children's academic progress will be assessed upon their return to school. This will inform us of how well they have been learning at home and it will allow teachers to adjust the curriculum to compensate for any missed learning.

 

How are children with particular needs supported in learning at home?

All pupils have access to remote learning and reasonable adjustments will be made to ensure that all children can engage with activities suited for them. Resources are distributed and individual lessons (Zoom) are scheduled when necessary, e.g. speech and language sessions.

 

Please use the links below to find out more about specific topics:

 

Support to keep your children safe online

 

Please use these resources to help you keep your child safe online:

  • support for parents and carers to keep children safe online (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-keeping-children-safe-online/coronavirus-covid19-support-for-parents-and-carers-to-keep-children-safe-online), which outlines resources to help keep children safe from different risks online and where to go to find support and advice 
  • guidance on staying safe online (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/covid-19-staying-safe-online) which includes information on security and privacy settings
  • Thinkuknow (https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/) provides advice from the National Crime Agency (NCA) on staying safe online
  • Parent info (https://parentinfo.org/) is a collaboration between Parentzone and the NCA providing support and guidance for parents from leading experts and organisations
  • Childnet (https://www.childnet.com/parents-and-carers/parent-and-carer-toolkit) offers a toolkit to support parents and carers of children of any age to start discussions about their online life, to set boundaries around online behaviour and technology use, and to find out where to get more help and support
  • Internet matters (https://www.internetmatters.org/? gclid=EAIaIQobChMIktuA5LWK2wIVRYXVCh2afg2aEAAYASAAEgIJ5vD_BwE) provides age-specific online safety checklists, guides on how to set parental controls on a range of devices, and a host of practical tips to help children get the most out of their digital world
  • London Grid for Learning (https://www.lgfl.net/online-safety/) has support for parents and carers to keep their children safe online, including tips to keep primary aged children safe online
  • Net-aware (https://www.net-aware.org.uk/) has support for parents and carers from the NSPCC, including a guide to social networks, apps and games
  • Let’s Talk About It (https://www.ltai.info/staying-safe-online/) has advice for parents and carers to keep children safe from online radicalisation
  • UK Safer Internet Centre (https://www.saferinternet.org.uk/advice-centre/parents-and-carers) has tips, advice, guides and other resources to help keep children safe online, including parental controls offered by home internet providers and safety tools on social networks and other online services
Top